Collateral damage

I have some answers, but not all. But what I do know right now is that our season is a total washout.

After using what many say is the best radiologist on the east coast to ultrasound Jack’s pastern, my vet called me with the opinion. The main abnormality that could be found had to do with the collateral ligament near the coffin joint. It appears that the inside of that ligament is enlarged, but unfortunately because of its location (partially in the foot) it is a difficult place to ultrasound.

So, our next step is to go to Tryon Equine Hospital, which is the closest facility to have a standing equine MRI. The MRI will give us so much more information around what is going on in Jack’s left fore, and allow us to come up with a more specific rehab plan based on the images.

Some of you may recall that Tryon is where Foster had his surgery, and I admit there is a strong sense of deja vu that I hope is mere coincidence for Jack. For now, I’ve been told to expect 10-12 months of rehabbing Jack but with the expectation to return to his job as an eventer and sporthorse.

Our MRI is July 2nd and 3rd (for follow-up images) and I will certainly keep everyone in the loop as we go on this unexpected journey. Stay tuned.

14 thoughts on “Collateral damage

      • So… mine had a small tear, if I’m remembering right. He had a few months of stall rest but was, um… not a good candidate for that, so ended up turned out for a year instead. I got him at the tail end of that and spent about 4 months working him back up to a normal work schedule. I was very careful about the rehab, starting on excellent footing and only straight lines, then eventually adding circles, varying the footing, etc. I kept him on a 4-week shoeing cycle. He did eventually return to showing, and I showed him through the 1.05m (jumping 1.10m at home), and then he re-injured his foot about a year later running around like an idiot in his paddock. These days he’s serviceably sound but obviously at higher risk of re-injury due to his history, so he’s mostly retired. Honestly, that horse was kind of pre-disposed to that due to his conformation. I know other people that have rehabbed the same injury and the horse has returned to a lengthy career afterwards. I think the most important part is the recovery and especially the rehab. Slow is fast with soft tissue.

  1. I’m so disappointed for you! I’m glad there’s a chance he’ll be able to come back and do his job fully again. Fingers crossed for best case scenario!

  2. Ugh, so sorry to hear this. Hoping that you get good information from the MRI and a solid plan for rehab. I am sure you have a ton of offers, however anytime that you would like (need) some saddle time please let me know. My two are always up for an adventure!

  3. Dang.. so bummed for you and the banana 😩!! My good friend’s gelding has a micro tear in the lateral collateral ligament (thinking she may have used the same specialist for her ultrasoundas you). So far, he’s been on strict stall rest for the past 2 months, now in a medical paddock setup for 3-4 more weeks. They also went ahead and injected bilateral coffin joints after not seeing improvement following 1 month stall rest, and have seen improvements. Once he was allowed to be in the medical paddock, vet approved the beginning stages of what may be about a 6 month rehab plan. My friend opted out of a visit to Tryon for the MRI for now… however if he’s not improved that’s the next step. Basically because they had a pretty good idea what the issue is and the treatment plan wouldn’t change with or without an MRI. Rest and wait to see.. lots of waiting.. hardest part! My fingers are crossed or Jack! I hope his prognosis will be promising, and that you two will be able to pick things up again after while❤️

  4. So frustrating! Just when you were hitting your groove! Keeping my fingers crossed that you get the “best of bad news” on this. If not, I have heard of various horses with similar injuries that went back to their jobs with proper rehab and conditioning.

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